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GIS.NY.GOV

NYS ITS GIS Program Office

Geographic Information Systems Clearinghouse

NYS Standards and Data Coordination Workgroup
(NYSDCW)

Comments on Proposed FGDC/URISA Street Address Data Standard - Working Draft 2.0
January 2006
Standard/Part/Section Comments Proposed Changes
1.3 Notation for Constructing Complex Elements Regarding the last item discussing the concatenation symbol, nowhere in this standard could we find a complex element definition that states spaces are optional or not required between any of the elements constructing the complex element. Only within the simple element 1.7.1.4 Separator Element is there a statement regarding optional spaces between elements. Complex elements containing the Zip Plus 4 element typically (and as shown in examples within the Standard) would not have spaces between the Zip Code and Zip Plus 4 elements, only a separator. Consideration should be given to redefining all complex elements containing Zip Code and Zip Plus 4 elements to include a Separator Element, a notation that spaces are not implied before or after the Separator Element, and indicate if it is required in the complex elements.

Another example where this notation would be needed is the last note in 1.7.1.5 Complete Address Number for the New York City-style hyphenated addresses (submitted as a separate comment specific to section 1.7.1.5).

Throughout the Standard, redefine all complex elements containing Zip Code and Zip Plus 4 elements to include a Separator Element and a notation that spaces are not implied before or after the Separator Element.

The Classification, Quality, and Transfer Sections of the Standard should also be reviewed for potential changes related to uses of the Separator Element in complex elements.

1.7.1.2 Address Number In the Notes/Comments section, add an example to the third bulleted comment regarding parsing of non-integer elements for further clarification on how non-integer elements are parsed.

Add at the end of the third bulleted comment in the Notes/Comments section: “For example, if the New York City hyphenated address 194-03 ½ 50 th Avenue, New York, NY 11365 were to be parsed rather than represented as a Complete Address Number, the Address Number Prefix would be “194”, the Separator would be “-“, the Address Number would be “03” and the Address Number Suffix would be “1/2”.

1.7.1.4 Separator Element

The Definition section should also discuss use of the Separator Element between the Zip Code and Zip Plus 4 elements.

Add a sentence to the Definition section to include the use of a Separator Element between the Zip Code Element and Zip Plus 4 Element in complex elements.
1.7.1.4 Separator Element The Definition section should also discuss use of the Separator Element between the Zip Code and Zip Plus 4 elements. Throughout section 1.7.1.4 Separator Element, replace “complete street number” with “Complete Address Number”.
1.7.1.4 Separator Element In the Example section, the Separator Elements in the examples need to be bolded for clarity. In the Example section, bold the hyphens and “and” separators.
1.7.1.5 Complex Element: Complete Address Number In the Notes/Comments section, the last bulleted comment that discusses hyphenated address numbers in New York City needs further clarification regarding when the number to the left of the hyphen changes and also that there must be no spaces before or after the Separator Element when constructing the Complete Address Number for a NYC-type hyphenated address.

Change the first sentence of the last bulleted comment in the Notes/Comments section to: “In New York City, hyphenated Complete Address Numbers (the recommended format for storing hyphenated addresses in New York City), follow a more complex set of rules.”

In the second sentence, change the text within the parenthesis to: “(conceptually—the number does not always change at street intersections and sometimes it changes within a single block face).”

Near the end of the same bulleted comment, change “The hyphen is a Separator Element.” to: “The hyphen is a Separator Element with no spaces inserted before or after the hyphen when constructing the Complete Address Number.”

1.7.1.5 Complex Element: Complete Address Number In the Notes/Comments section, the fourth bulleted comment has two instances of double closure parenthesis “))" that should be represented with only single closure parenthesis “)”. In the Notes/Comments section, replace the double closure parenthesis with single closure parenthesis.
1.7.1.6 Complex Element: Address Number Range In the Example section, the Address Number Range Element in the last example should be bolded for clarity. It is also suggested that for display purposes, in this last example only two spaces be placed both before and after the middle dash character to highlight the syntax of this element. Bold “214-02 – 213-14 ½” in the last example.
1.7.1.6 Complex Element: Address Number Range In the Notes/Comments section, the second through fifth bulleted comments (2-5) should be indented to clarify that they are associated with the first bulleted comment. In the Notes/Comments section, indent bulleted comments 2-5.
1.7.1.6 Complex Element: Address Number Range In the Notes/Comments section, the last bulleted comment is inconsistently worded with the fifth bulleted comment in the Notes/Comments section of 1.7.1.5 Complex Element: Complete Address Number.

In the Notes/Comments section, change the third sentence in the last bulleted comment to: “The former comprises two Address Numbers while the latter is a single Address Number.”

1.7.2.2 Street Name Pre Directional In the Notes/Comments section, the last bulleted comment incorrectly references “post-directionals” when it should reference “pre-directionals.” In the Notes/Comments section, change the two occurrences of “post-directionals” in the last bulleted comment to “pre-directionals.”
1.7.2.3 Street Name Pre Type
In the Notes/Comments section, the first bulleted comment indicates that a street cannot have both a pre-type and a post-type; however, in New York City this does occur. Specifically in Manhattan there is a street named “Avenue C Loop”. (Locate in maps.google.com: Avenue C Loop, New York, NY 10009)
Delete the first bullet in the Notes/Comments section.
1.7.2.3 Street Name Pre Type In the Notes/Comments section, the last sentence in the third bulleted comment incorrectly references directionals rather than pre-types and post-types.

In the Notes/Comments section, change the last sentence in the third bulleted comment to: “If stored unabbreviated, the pre-types and post-types can be exported as standard abbreviations as needed for mailing and other purposes.”

1.7.2.4 Street Name In the Notes/Comments section, the second bulleted comment lists examples for numbered streets in parenthesis. The examples should include “20”, another common reference to numbered streets.

In the Notes/Comments section, change the numbered street examples in the second bulleted comment to: (“Twentieth”, “20 th”, or “20”)

1.7.2.5 Street Name Post Type In the Notes/Comments section, the first bulleted comment indicates that a street cannot have both a pre-type and a post-type however in New York City this does occur. Specifically in Manhattan there is a street named “Avenue C Loop”. (Locate in maps.google.com: Avenue C Loop, New York, NY 10009). Delete the first bullet in the Notes/Comments section.
1.7.2.5 Street Name Post Type In the Notes/Comments section, the last sentence in the third bulleted comment incorrectly references directionals rather than pre-types and post-types.

In the Notes/Comments section, change the last sentence in the third bulleted comment to: “If stored unabbreviated, the pre-types and post-types can be exported as standard abbreviations as needed for mailing and other purposes.”

1.7.2.6 Street Name Post Directional In the Example section, the two exceptions listed in the “USPS Publication 28 Notes” that discuss directional letters (N, E, W, S) used as alphabet indicators would benefit by including parsed out examples.

In the Example section, add examples and parse the street name appropriately for the two exceptions that discuss directional letters (N, E, W, S) used as alphabet indicators:

233.23: Example: “Avenue E South” (Pre Type is “Avenue”, Street Name is “E”, Post-Directional is “South”)

233.3: Example: “Avenue E” (Pre Type is “Avenue”, Street Name is “E”)
1.7.2.6 Street Name Post Directional In the Notes/Comments section, the bulleted comments following the fourth bulleted comment (“USPS Publication 28 Notes”) should be indented to clarify that they are associated with the preceding bulleted comment.

Also in the same section, the text in the third bulleted comment from the end should be included with the preceding bullet that begins with “233.3 Directional as Part of Street Name”.

In the Notes/Comments section, indent the bulleted comments following the fourth bulleted comment, “USPS Publication 28 Notes”.

Also in the same section, combine the third bullet from the end with the bullet immediately preceding it that begins with “233.3 Directional as Part of Street Name”.

1.7.2.6 Street Name Post Directional In the Notes/Comments section, the bullet beginning with “233.23 Two Directionals –” is missing a single closure parenthesis “)”. Add a single closure parenthesis to the end of bulleted item 233.23.
1.7.2.8 Complete Street Name

In the Notes/Comments section, the first bulleted comment indicates that a street cannot have both a pre-type and a post-type however in New York City this does occur. Specifically in Manhattan there is a street named “Avenue C Loop”. (Locate in maps.google.com: Avenue C Loop, New York, NY 10009)

Delete the second sentence in the first bulleted comment in the Notes/Comments section.
1.7.2.8 Complete Street Name In the Example section, the Complete Street Name Complex Element in the examples should be bolded for clarity. In the Example section, bold the Complete Street Name Complex Elements in the examples.
1.7.3.4 Floor Type In the Example section, the Floor Type Element in the second example should be bolded for clarity. In the Example section, bold “Floor” in the second example.
1.7.3.5 Floor Identifier In the Example section, the Floor Identifier Element in the second example should be bolded for clarity. In the Example section, bold “Mezzanine” in the second example.
1.7.3.7 Unit Type In the Example section, the Unit Type Elements in the first and third examples should be bolded for clarity. In the Example section, bold “Apartment” in the first example and “Apartamento” in the third example.
1.7.3.8 Unit Identifier The Domain of Values for this Element section is unpopulated. Assign “No” as the Domain of Values.
1.7.3.11 Complex Element: Complete Occupancy Identifier In the Example section, the Complete Occupancy Identifier Complex Element in the first example should be bolded for clarity. In the Example section, bold “Building 12, Mezzanine Level, Suite 200” in the first example.
1.7.5.1 Community Place Name

New York City is an incorporated city with five administrative or (from Merriam Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary) “constituent political divisions” known as “Boroughs”. Boroughs are a large, formal subdivision of New York City and since they fit the Community Place Name Element definition, “Borough” should be added as another common name for this element.

Note that New York City also has neighborhood names within each Borough. For example, the address 64-00 Saunders Street in Zip Code 11374 has three different Place Names:

  • USPS Place Name: Flushing
  • Community Place Name (Borough): Queens
  • Community Place Name (neighborhood): Rego Park

In the Other common names for this element section, add “Borough of New York City”.

In the Example section, add “ Edgewater Park” as an example.

In the Notes/Comments section add: “ New York City comprises five administrative “Boroughs” (Bronx, Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island). The Boroughs are legally distinct from the five Counties that are also subdivisions of New York City (Bronx, Kings, New York, Queens, and Richmond) even though the Boroughs and Counties have identical boundaries and two even share the same name.

1.7.5.1 Community Place Name In the Example section, only one of the examples has the Community Place Name Element bolded. All examples should have the Community Place Name Element bolded for clarity. In the Example section, bold the Community Place Name Elements in the examples.
1.7.5.2 Municipal Jurisdiction In the Example section, the Municipal Jurisdiction Element in the second example should be bolded for clarity. In the Example section, bold “ Castle Rock Township” in the second example.
1.7.5.5 Complex Element: Place Name In the Notes/Comments section, the four bulleted comments following the first bulleted comment should be indented to clarify that they are the four types of place names recognized by the Standard that the first bulleted comment is referencing. Similarly the last four bulleted comments should be indented to clarify that they are the four selection rules the immediately preceding bulleted comment is referencing. In the Notes/Comments section, indent the four bulleted comments following the first bulleted comment and also indent the last four bulleted comments.
1.7.5.6 State Name In 1.7.5.6 State Name there are two typographical errors associated with periods that should be commas.

In the Other common names for this Element section, change the period following “MA” to a comma.

In the Notes/Comments section, change the period following “small” to a comma.

1.7.5.9 Nation Name In the Notes/Comments section, the word “to” is missing from the first sentence. In the Notes/Comments section, add the word “to” in the first sentence: “…is restricted to US addresses…”
1.8.2.6 Address Z Value The Domain of Values for this Element section is unpopulated. Assign “See notes below” as the Domain of Values.
1.8.2.6 Address Z Value It would be helpful to have examples shown for both ratio measurements and ordinal measurements. Add Address Z Values examples to section 1.8.2.6.
1.8.3.4 Address Official Status The Definition section seems to imply that “official” is a valid value for this descriptive attribute. However the Domain of Values for this Element section refers the reader to the Notes/Comments section which only includes notes about Alternate/Alias names. If the only valid Domain values for this descriptive attribute are those referring to Alternate/Alias names as listed in the Notes/Comments section, a more appropriate element name would be “Alternate Address Type”. However if “Official” is a valid Domain value for this descriptive attribute, it should be noted in the Notes/Comments section. In the Notes/Comments section, add a bulleted comment describing “Official Name” as a valid Domain value otherwise change the Element Name to “Alternate Address Type”.
1.8.3.4 Address Official Status In the Notes/Comments section, there is a spelling error in the last bulleted comment. In the Notes/Comments section, change “Altername” in the last bulleted comment to “Alternate”.
1.8.3.6 Address Range Type In the Domain of Values for this Element section, it is not clear if “Actual/theoretical” is referring just to “site” or if would apply to all of the domains listed. We believe it should apply to all domains. Further clarification is needed to eliminate potential confusion. If “Actual/theoretical” refers to all domain values listed, in the Domain of Values for this Element section, add a colon immediately after “Actual/theoretical” so it clearly applies to all listed domains.
1.8.3.6 Address Range Type In the Domain of Values for this Element section, the “hyphenated single address number” domain should not be listed as a domain since it does not reference an address range, but only a single address. In the Domain of Values for this Element section, delete “hyphenated single address number (not a range at all)”.
1.8.4.1 Address Number Parity Parity is not used for individual addresses but rather for address ranges. A more appropriate Element Name is “Address Range Parity”. Change the Element Name to “ Address Range Parity”.
1.8.4.1 Address Number Parity This element should be required with the Address Number Range Complex Element. Add a “Required Element” section with the following text: “Required with Address Number Range Complex Element”
1.8.4.1 Address Number Parity In the Domain of Values for this Element section, “both” should be a valid domain to indicate an address range that encompasses both odd and even address numbers. This case arises where both odd and even addresses exist on the same side of a street. Add “both” to the Domain of Values for this Element section.
1.8.4.2 Address Scheme Name The Domain of Values for this Element section is unpopulated. Since these are locally defined and the Address Scheme Name Element in 1.8.4.7 Address Scheme Complex Element is clearly a locally defined value, there should not be any Domain values. Assign “No” as the Domain of Values.
1.8.4.4 Address Scheme Origin Throughout section 1.8.4.4 there are several misspellings of the word “axis”. Throughout section 1.8.4.4, change “axes” to axis”.
1.8.4.5 Address Scheme Axes Throughout section 1.8.4.5 there are several misspellings of the word “axis”, including the attribute name. Throughout section 1.8.4.5, change “axes” to axis”.
1.8.4.7 Complex Element: Address Scheme Throughout section 1.8.4.7 there are several misspellings of the word “axis”. Throughout section 1.8.4.7, change “axes” to axis”.
2.4 Formatting Conventions Since bolding was removed from all Syntax statements in the Street Address Data Classification section, the last two sentences in this section are no longer valid and can be deleted. In item 3, delete the last two sentences beginning with “Because they occur in every address class, and always in the same order…”
2.5.1 Thoroughfare Address Classes Thoroughfare Address Classes are not always “designated by a number” as stated in the second sentence. Specifically, 2.5.1.3 Intersection Address and 2.5.1.6 Unnumbered Thoroughfare Address do not include a Complete Address Number in their syntax. Modify the second sentence to indicate that a thoroughfare name is always specified but an address number is only sometimes specified in a Thoroughfare Address Class.
2.5.1.1 Site Addresses The Examples section provides a good mix of element combinations although noticeably missing is a combination that includes a Zip Plus 4 Element. In the Examples section, add a Zip Plus 4 Element to one of the existing examples.
2.5.1.2 Landmark-Site Address At the end of the Syntax line there appears to be a misplaced asterisk (*). Delete the asterisk (*) at the end of the Syntax line following “{Nation Name}”.
2.5.1.4 Two-number Address Range In the Notes section, for consistency there should be a bulleted comment discussing Address Range Parity, similar to the second bulleted comment in 2.5.1.5 Four-number Address Range. It should also indicate that Address Range Parity is a required attribute with the Address Number Range Complex Element. In the Notes section, add a bulleted comment discussing Address Range Parity, including its requirement as an attribute with the Address Number Range Complex Element.
2.5.1.4 Two-number Address Range In the Notes section, the word “be” is missing from the last sentence.

In the Notes section, add the word “be” in the last sentence: ‘…“ 214-02 Evergreen St” would be one address…’

2.5.1.5 Four-number Address Range In the Notes section, the second bulleted comment should also indicate that Address Range Parity is a required attribute with the Address Number Range Complex Element for consistency with 2.5.1.4 Two-number Address Range. In the Notes section, the second bulleted comment should also include a sentence regarding its requirement as an attribute with the Address Number Range Complex Element.
2.5.2.2 Multi-Site Landmark Address In the Examples section, the Zip Code in the second example is missing a zero. In the Examples section, change the “1001” Zip Code in the second example to “10004”.
2.5.2.3 Community (Urbanization) Address Since the Examples Section only provides Puerto Rican addresses, someone could incorrectly assume that this Landmark Address Class only applies to addresses in Puerto Rico. An example in the continental United States should be included.

In the Examples section, add the following valid address in New York City that utilizes a Community Place Name: “23B Edgewater Park, Bronx, NY 10465”

2.5.2.3 Community (Urbanization) Address In the Notes section, “number” and “landmark class” in the second bulleted comment are a little too broad and could use further clarification.

In the Notes section, change the second bulleted comment to: “If no Address Number precedes the Urbanization Name, the address fits into one of the Address Landmark Classes.

2.5.2.3 Community (Urbanization) Address In the Notes section, “Landmark-site class” in the third bulleted comment could be confused as a Landmark Address Class, especially with the reference to the Address Landmark Class in the preceding bulleted comment. It is suggested that the class be further clarified as a Thoroughfare Address Class.

In the Notes section, change the third bulleted comment to: “If the address includes a reference to a thoroughfare, the address fits in the “Landmark-Site Address” Thoroughfare Address Class.

2.5.3.2 USPS Postal Delivery Route At the beginning of the Type 3: Overseas Military Delivery Syntax line, “(PSC, CMR, or UNIT):” duplicates the first element name in the Syntax line and causes confusion. In the beginning of the Type 3: Overseas Military Delivery Syntax line, delete “(PSC, CMR, or UNIT):”
2.5.3.3 USPS General Delivery Address In the General Delivery Note and Example section, the example shown is a single, complete mailing address. It is not two separate examples. In the General Delivery Note and Example section, change the “Example:” heading to “Complete Example:” and remove the two open circle bullet symbols.
2.5.3.3 USPS General Delivery Address In the Overseas Military Addresses and Notes and Example section, the Complete Example shown at the end of the section is a single, complete mailing address. It is not two separate examples. In the Overseas Military Addresses and Notes and Example section, and remove the two open circle bullet symbols.
Part 3: Introduction In the third paragraph of the Introduction, there are two sentences that incorrectly end with double periods. In the third paragraph of the Introduction, remove the duplicate periods at the end of the second and third sentences.
3.1.1 Objectives of Existing Standards: Table In the Purpose for the “Geographic information – Data quality measures (ISO 19138)” Standard, there is a spelling error. In the Purpose for the “Geographic information–Data quality measures” Standard, change “standardising” to standardizing”.
3.4.1 Testing Data Types of Simple Elements In the Pseudocode Example: Testing the Conformance of a Data Set section, the beginning of the sentence stating “If the data are in field that conforms to type” is not clear and requires further clarification. In the Pseudocode Example: Testing the Conformance of a Data Set, rewrite the sentence in question.
3.4.1 Testing Data Types of Simple Elements In the Measure Description section, there is an unnecessary occurrence of the word “they” in the very last sentence. In the Measure Description section, delete the word “they” from the last sentence.
3.4.2 Domains and Sources of Values for Simple Elements The second paragraph identifies how CSDGM classifies domains but nowhere in this Standard could we find definitions for the four domain classifications listed. Since these four classes are used throughout the Data Quality Section, it is suggested that these four classes be defined in this section. In the second paragraph, add definitions for the “enumerated”, “range”, “codeset”, and “unrepresentable” domains.
3.6.1.1 Address X Coordinate, Address Y Coordinate and Address Longitude, Address Latitude The Measure Name for the US National Grid Coordinate has a capitalization error. In the Measure Name section, change “Usng” to “USNG”.
3.6.2.9 Location Description In the Evaluation Procedure section, there is an unnecessary occurrence of the words “It can” at the beginning of the second sentence. In the Evaluation Procedure section, delete “It can” at the beginning of the second sentence.
3.7.2.2 Check for Address Number Range Completeness This section appears to be a subsection for 3.7.2.1 and should not have a section number associated with its heading. From the heading, remove the “3.7.2.2” section number.
3.7.2.1 Address Number Range: Check Address Number Range against Scheme Origin In the Evaluation Procedure section, there are two typographical errors. In the Evaluation Procedure section, change “distinces” to “distances” in the first sentence and change “is great than” to “is greater than” in the last sentence.
3.7.2.1 Address Number Range: Check Address Number Range against Address Scheme Axes In the Measure Description section, there are several typographical errors. In the Measure Description section, change “touching the centerline” to “touches the centerline” in the second sentence. Also, change “Axes” to “Axis” throughout this entire Check Address Number Range against Address Scheme Axes” section, including the title.
3.7.2.1 Address Number Range (page 103) In the Check Consistency of Odd and Even Parity section, if this Standard is expanded to include “Both” as a valid value for Parity, then the test here would be to check the Parity of an Address Number Range that is “Even” or “Odd” but you could not test for “Both”. Modify this test to confirm that the low and high address numbers agree with their specified parity unless the Parity is specified as “Both”, in which case no parity validation is possible.
3.9.1 Test for conformance to Address Number Range or domain In the Measure Description section, there is an unnecessary occurrence of the word “is” in the first sentence of the second paragraph. In the Measure Description section, change “This is test is…” in the second paragraph to “This test is…”.
3.10 Postal Service Delivery Addresses The first sentence references checks for uniqueness “as noted above” but this is too vague and should instead identify by section the uniqueness checks that should be performed on Postal Service Delivery Addresses. In the first sentence, replace “as noted above” with references to the section(s) that contain the uniqueness checks that should be performed.
4.3.2 Crosswalk Chart, page 119 The “Address Scheme Axes” class name is misspelled as well as two other occurrences of the word “axis” in the same line. In the Crosswalk Chart on page 119, change “axes” to axis” (3 occurrences).
Appendix C Throughout Appendix C there are several misspellings of the word “axis”. In Appendix C, change all occurrences of “axes” to “axis”.